My Blog

Posts for: February, 2019

By Colesville Dentistry
February 26, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tads  
AnchorageDevicesEnableGreaterPrecisionDuringOrthodonticTreatment

As a basic orthodontic appliance, braces are what allows us to move teeth into better positions to improve a person’s bite. In certain cases, though, this treatment application gets a little assistance from Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) to improve accuracy and reduce treatment time.

Braces take advantage of our teeth’s natural ability to move. Teeth are held in place within the bone by the periodontal ligament, an elastic tissue that attaches to the teeth with microscopic fibers secured by a hardened substance called cementum. The periodontal ligament is constantly remodeling in response to changes in the mouth. As pressure is placed on a tooth, new bone, ligament and cementum are formed on the “pulling” side of the tooth; on the other side, the bone and ligament dissolve (resorb), allowing the tooth to move in that direction.

Braces allow this natural process to occur with controlled forces applied by thin flexible wires threaded through the small brackets attached to the front of the teeth and then affixed or “anchored” to other teeth. By attaching the teeth to the other teeth by wires running through all the brackets, “anchorage” is created to allow teeth to be moved where the dentist wants them to go. By adjusting the tension on the wires, we can apply light but constant pressure on the “unanchored” teeth to move them into a new desired position.

Teeth we do not want to move are referred to as the anchorage for teeth we do want to move. If, however, the situation calls for more precise isolation of teeth to be moved, TADs can be very useful. TADs are mini-implants imbedded in the bone to serve as anchorage at strategic locations in the mouth. In this way, the group of teeth to be moved receives forces that are applied through the additional anchorage provided by the TADs. That “tension” or “pressure” is applied only to them and not to adjacent teeth that should not move. This increases efficiency for tooth movement and helps reduce the treatment time.

TADs can be placed using local anesthesia and with little discomfort, and are removed when orthodontic treatment is completed. Although the procedure is pretty straightforward, it does require collaboration between orthodontist and surgeon to ensure correct positioning.

In the end, TADs increase our ability to control the forces that move teeth during orthodontic treatment. This lessens discomfort for the patient and helps ensure the end result — a more functional bite and a transformed smile.

If you would like more information on the use of TADs and other orthodontic appliances, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “What are TADs?


By Colesville Dentistry
February 16, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
WemayNeedtoBuilduptheBoneinYourJawbeforeImplants

Dental implant technology has advanced at such an astounding rate in recent years that you can now walk into a dentist's office with a problem tooth and out the same day with a new one. Unfortunately, not all dental situations allow for this possibility.

For example, you might be considering an implant many years after losing a tooth. But there's a potential problem: there might not be enough supporting bone. While an implant might still be possible, inadequate bone complicates the matter.

Because implants are essentially tooth root replacements, they require a certain amount of bone for stability and the best attractive outcome. As a general rule, implants need to be surrounded by  at least 1.5-2.0 millimeters of healthy bone to support an implant. But you might not have enough if your tooth has been missing for awhile, regardless if you have or haven't worn dentures or other restorations.

That's because bone has a life cycle in which older cells die and newer ones form to take their place. As we chew or bite, the force generated travels up through the teeth to the bone to stimulate this new growth. Without a tooth the bone doesn't receive this stimulus, which can slow the growth rate. Over time the affected bone can lose its volume and density.

If we find you've experienced loss to the point your bone won't support an implant, that doesn't automatically mean this popular restoration is out of the picture. But it will require us first performing a procedure known as augmentation or bone grafting to help rejuvenate some of the lost bone.

With grafting, we place processed bone grafting material in the jaw through a minor surgical procedure to form a scaffold for new bone to grow upon. After several months this can result in several millimeters of new growth maintaining the width of the underlying bone, which in turn may be able to support an implant.

Bone grafting is quite common, often performed at the same time as tooth extraction if there's going to be a time lag before installing an implant. Even if performed later, though, it can successfully rejuvenate lost bone and make it possible for you to take advantage of durable, life-like implants.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants after Previous Tooth Loss.”


By Colesville Dentistry
February 06, 2019
Category: Oral Health
InTodaysNFLOralHygieneTakesCenterStage

Everyone knows that in the game of football, quarterbacks are looked up to as team leaders. That's why we're so pleased to see some NFL QB's setting great examples of… wait for it… excellent oral hygiene.

First, at the 2016 season opener against the Broncos, Cam Newton of the Carolina Panthers was spotted on the bench; in his hands was a strand of dental floss. In between plays, the 2105 MVP was observed giving his hard-to-reach tooth surfaces a good cleaning with the floss.

Later, Buffalo Bills QB Tyrod Taylor was seen on the sideline of a game against the 49ers — with a bottle of mouthwash. Taylor took a swig, swished it around his mouth for a minute, and spit it out. Was he trying to make his breath fresher in the huddle when he called out plays?

Maybe… but in fact, a good mouthrinse can be much more than a short-lived breath freshener.

Cosmetic rinses can leave your breath with a minty taste or pleasant smell — but the sensation is only temporary. And while there's nothing wrong with having good-smelling breath, using a cosmetic mouthwash doesn't improve your oral hygiene — in fact, it can actually mask odors that may indicate a problem, such as tooth decay or gum disease.

Using a therapeutic mouthrinse, however, can actually enhance your oral health. Many commonly available therapeutic rinses contain anti-cariogenic (cavity-fighting) ingredients, such as fluoride; these can help prevent tooth decay and cavity formation by strengthening tooth enamel. Others contain antibacterial ingredients; these can help control the harmful oral bacteria found in plaque — the sticky film that can build up on your teeth in between cleanings. Some antibacterial mouthrinses are available over-the-counter, while others are prescription-only. When used along with brushing and flossing, they can reduce gum disease (gingivitis) and promote good oral health.

So why did Taylor rinse? His coach Rex Ryan later explained that he was cleaning out his mouth after a hard hit, which may have caused some bleeding. Ryan also noted, “He [Taylor] does have the best smelling breath in the league for any quarterback.” The coach didn't explain how he knows that — but never mind. The takeaway is that a cosmetic rinse may be OK for a quick fix — but when it comes to good oral hygiene, using a therapeutic mouthrinse as a part of your daily routine (along with flossing and brushing) can really step up your game.

If you would like more information about mouthrinses and oral hygiene, contact us or schedule a consultation.




Contact us

Please do not submit any Protected Health Information (PHI).

Our Location

724 Cloverly St.Silver Spring, MD 20905