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Posts for: March, 2017

By Colesville Dentistry
March 28, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

If you are looking to get a visibly whiter smile then it’s time to talk to us.teeth whitening

If you’ve been using whitening toothpastes and at-home whitening kits every day for weeks then you may be a bit frustrated to not see the results you were hoping for. When you put in so much time and effort you want to see all the hard work pay off. Unfortunately, these over the counter treatments often leave something to be desired, which is why it’s a good time to visit our Silver Spring, MD, cosmetic dentists, Dr. Gregory Hysong and Dr. Lynda LePore if you truly want to brighten your smile for the long-term.

Before getting teeth whitening in Silver Spring, you may want to ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you looking to brighten your smile quickly?
  • Are you trying to get your smile whiter before a special occasion or important event?
  • Are you looking to treat ugly yellow stains?
  • Are you an avid coffee drinker or someone who indulges in a lot of stain-producing foods and drinks?

If you said “yes” to these questions, teeth whitening might be a great option for you. Our system contains a high concentration of hydrogen peroxide to ensure that you get results quickly.

How does teeth whitening work?

When the whitening gel comes in contact with the teeth the active ingredient (typically hydrogen peroxide) destroys stain molecules within the enamel and dentin layers of the teeth to break up stains and to leave your smile looking whiter and more radiant.

It’s important to note that while teeth whitening is a great option for many people looking to give their smile a vibrant makeover, it isn’t always the best option for everyone. Teeth whitening will not work on internal stains (stains caused by trauma or certain medications) and it will not brighten restorations such as fillings or crowns.

If you are interested in getting professional teeth whitening in Silver Spring, MD, then it’s time you scheduled a consultation with Colesville Dentistry to find out if you are the ideal candidate for treatment.


By Colesville Dentistry
March 16, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
ArianaGrandeBreaksFree-ofHerWisdomTeeth

Via a recent Instagram post, pop diva Ariana Grande became the latest young celebrity to publicly acknowledge a dental milestone: having her wisdom teeth removed. The singer of hits such as “Break Free” and “Problem” posted an after-surgery picture of herself (wearing her signature cat-eye eyeliner), with a caption addressed to her teeth: “Peace out, final three wisdom teeth. It’s been real.”

With the post, Grande joined several other celebs (including Lily Allen, Paris Hilton and Emile Hirsch) who have shared their dental surgery experience with fans. Will "wisdom teeth removal" become a new trending topic on social media? We aren’t sure — but we can explain a bit about the procedure, and why many younger adults may need it.

Technically called the “third molars,” wisdom teeth usually begin to emerge from the gums between the ages of 17 and 25 — presumably, around the same time that a certain amount of wisdom emerges. Most people have four of these big molars, which are located all the way in the back of the mouth, on the left and right sides of the upper and lower jaws.

But when wisdom teeth begin to appear, there’s often a problem: Many people don’t have enough space in their jaws to accommodate them. When these molars lack sufficient space to fully erupt (emerge), they are said to be “impacted.” Impacted teeth can cause a number of serious problems: These may include pain, an increased potential for bacterial infections, periodontal disease, and even the formation of cysts (pockets of infection below the gum line), which can eventually lead to tooth and bone loss.

In most cases, the best treatment for impacted wisdom teeth is extraction (removal) of the problem teeth. Wisdom tooth extraction is a routine, in-office procedure that is usually performed under local anesthesia or “conscious sedation,” a type of anesthesia where the patient remains conscious (able to breathe normally and respond to stimuli), but is free from any pain or distress. Anti-anxiety medications may also be given, especially for those who are apprehensive about dental procedures.

So if you find you need your wisdom teeth extracted, don’t be afraid to “Break Free” like Ariana Grande did; whether you post the results on social media is entirely up to you. If you would like more information about wisdom tooth extraction, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “Removing Wisdom Teeth.”


EvenifaRootCanalWontWorkThisProcedureCouldSaveyourTooth

A root canal treatment is a highly effective way to save a deeply decayed tooth. Sometimes, though, complications make it difficult or even impossible to perform the traditional procedure. In those cases, we may need to use a different option.

Tooth decay becomes an imminent threat to a tooth's survival if it works its way into the pulp, the innermost layer of a tooth. It's only a short advancement from there into the roots by way of the root canals.

In a typical root canal treatment, we access the pulp by drilling a small hole in the biting surface of a back tooth or the back side of a front tooth. We remove all the tissue within the pulp and fill it and the root canals with a special filling to prevent re-infection. After sealing the access hole, we cap the tooth with a crown to further protect it.

Although root canal treatments have a high success rate, re-infection can still occur. Often, a second root canal will save the tooth from the new infection.

In some cases, though, using the traditional procedure might do more harm than good. It's possible we may find extra canals previously undetected branching out from the primary canal at the root end. Canals can calcify and narrow, making them extremely difficult to fill. Subsequent dental work may also prove troublesome: we would have to take the restoration apart, which could further weaken the tooth.

The alternative is a procedure known as an apicoectomy. Instead of accessing the pulp through the crown, we access the root end through the gum tissue. We then focus on removing infected tissue at the tooth's root end, along with a tiny amount of the root tip. We then place a small filling at the end of the root canal (essentially plugging it up) to prevent further infection. We may also perform grafting to encourage bone growth in any voids left by the procedure.

Endodontists, specialists in root canals, have the advanced training and specialized equipment to perform an apicoectomy. With their expertise, they may be able to save your tooth with this specialized procedure when a root canal treatment won't work.

If you would like more information on options for treating decayed teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Apicoectomy: A Surgical Option When Root Canal Treatment Fails.”




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